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    Sounds of Homes :: Shane Fahey & Tegan Northwood

    CD, jewel case with 4-page booklet

    1 hour soundscape of habitats of Kioloa State Forest and Murramarang National Park, Kioloa, NSW, covering twelve locations around Kioloa and Murramarang - forest and coastal habitats interfacing with newly residential areas.

    Recorded on the lands of the Walbanga people of the Yuin nation.
    Dedicated to all people who have loved and cared for this land, past and present.

    (c) 2010 Shane Fahey and Tegan Northwood
    (p) 2016 Shane Fahey and Tegan Northwood
    All rights reserved.

    photography and videography by Honi Ryan.
    Layout by Tegan Northwood and Nic Cassey.

    Includes unlimited streaming of Sounds of Homes via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
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about

1-hour environmental soundscape of habitats in and around Kioloa, south-coast NSW - swamp, open forest, closed forest, rainforest, coastal foreshore communities, interfacing with newly residential areas.

CD, jewel case with 4-page booklet

credits

released December 4, 2016

all field recordings by Shane Fahey and Tegan Northwood
recorded in the lands of the Walbanga people of the Yuin nation, south coast NSW - Kioloa State Forest and Murramarang National Park, NSW
soundscape composition by Tegan Northwood
mixed by Shane Fahey and Tegan Northwood
mastering by Shane Fahey
Thanks to Richard Hardwick for help with accessing our locations, and Steve and Robyn at the ANU coastal campus at Kioloa for accommodation.

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Track Name: pre-dawn mist, Higgins Creek
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Cockwhy Swamp dawn chorus
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Cockwhy rainforest
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Cousens Gully forest
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Windy Eucalypts, windy forest near Dangerboard
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Singing Stones
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: back of our old property
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Cousens Gully Creek
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: back of our property ii
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Durras Mountain 'amphitheatre' - tall forest, evening
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: Durras Cave
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood
Track Name: our dams, evening into night
This work evolved out of my own need to render the essence of a place I spent much time in as both a child and adult, as both a holiday visitor and permanent resident, with family and without.

My family originally owned a large section of land bordering the forest at Kioloa, on the south-coast of NSW (Kioloa State Forest, and what is now Murramurrang National Park). They were one of the original farm residents in the area (in early years permanent, in later years part-time). Against my wishes, our house, (the last of our land) was sold in 2005, most already having been sold to developers to create a subdivision in the preceding five to ten years.

This is a theme constantly being acted out across the Australian landscape – intact bushland being lost to realtors making inflated capital gains out of property development on land they claim as their own. In this case, my own family were the ones to originally lease and clear the land, later buying it from the government and many years later selling it to developers for a large profit.

I feel I had a human, personal experience of the habitat loss that animals experience – normally humans can just move somewhere else if their home is sold, but trees, insects, birds and animals can’t do this. Neither could I, as our place at Kioloa, and Kioloa itself was my refuge and the place geographically I resonate with more than anywhere else.

I wanted to acknowledge the beautiful habitats around Kioloa and the diverse ecology of the area, and hopefully instill an urge in residents and visitors to appreciate and listen to these areas for their own worth.

Shane became involved with this project in 2008 when we began concertedly recording these Kioloa environments with the idea of making a 2-CD package of raw field recordings and soundscapes made from these recordings. Shane has been the driving force behind this work becoming an installation.

Honi has brought great patience, willingness and skill to this piece, and had the difficult task of trying to capture visually in a few months what Shane and I had done over three years with audio. We deeply appreciate her involvement.

Thanks to Robin and Steve at Kioloa Coastal Campus (ANU) for accommodating us; and to Richard Hardwick for taking us to some special sites, and for assistance early on.

Tegan Northwood